David Pond
lawrenceleemagnuson:

Henri Matisse (1869-1954)A Glimpse of Notre Dame in the Late Afternoon - Notre-Dame, une fin d’après-midi (1902) oil on paper mounted on canvas 72.5 x 54.5 cmAlbright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY

lawrenceleemagnuson:


Henri Matisse (1869-1954)
A Glimpse of Notre Dame in the Late Afternoon - Notre-Dame, une fin d’après-midi (1902)
oil on paper mounted on canvas 72.5 x 54.5 cm
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY

lonequixote:

Orchard in Blossom ~ Vincent van Gogh

lonequixote:

Orchard in Blossom ~ Vincent van Gogh

losangelespast:

A huge crowd turns out to celebrate the opening of Union Station, Los Angeles, May 4, 1939. 
"Stirring awake memories that had slumbered for more than a century, railroad officials yesterday staged a colorful pageant of transportation that thrilled thousands of Angelenos for two hours. Gayly costumed ladies of the Gay Nineties — and the years before — rode stage coaches and horse cars and stuttering, slow-moving trains of another era. Derby-hatted, mustachioed gentlemen in tight coats pumped high-wheeled bicycles — ‘bone-crushers’ they were known as in those days — all to celebrate formal opening of the new Union Station, pictured in background as oldest Union Pacific train approaches the city’s newest in beautiful architecture." — The Los Angeles Examiner 

losangelespast:

A huge crowd turns out to celebrate the opening of Union Station, Los Angeles, May 4, 1939. 

"Stirring awake memories that had slumbered for more than a century, railroad officials yesterday staged a colorful pageant of transportation that thrilled thousands of Angelenos for two hours. Gayly costumed ladies of the Gay Nineties — and the years before — rode stage coaches and horse cars and stuttering, slow-moving trains of another era. Derby-hatted, mustachioed gentlemen in tight coats pumped high-wheeled bicycles — ‘bone-crushers’ they were known as in those days — all to celebrate formal opening of the new Union Station, pictured in background as oldest Union Pacific train approaches the city’s newest in beautiful architecture." — The Los Angeles Examiner 

The planet does not need more successful people. The planet desperately needs more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers and lovers of all kinds
Dalai Lama (via chronicillnesspanda)

cinephilearchive:

“All we need is some forest and hills.” Eric Burritt shared a great vintage article on how 22 years old Stanley Kubrick planned to make his first feature film, ‘Fear and Desire.’

If you were nineteen and starting out again, would you go to film school?
The best education in film is to make one. I would advise any neophyte director to try to make a film by himself. A three-minute short will teach him a lot. I know that all the things I did at the beginning were, in microcosm, the things I’m doing now as a director and producer. There are a lot of noncreative aspects to filmmaking which have to be overcome, and you will experience them all when you make even the simplest film: business, organization, taxes, etc., etc. It is rare to be able to have an uncluttered, artistic environment when you make a film, and being able to accept this is essential. The point to stress is that anyone seriously interested in making a film should find as much money as he can as quickly as he can and go out and do it. And this is no longer as difficult as it once was. When I began making movies as an independent in the early 1950s I received a fair amount of publicity because I was something of a freak in an industry dominated by a handful of huge studios. Everyone was amazed that it could be done at all. But anyone can make a movie who has a little knowledge of cameras and tape recorders, a lot of ambition and — hopefully — talent. It’s gotten down to the pencil and paper level. We’re really on the threshold of a revolutionary new era in film. —Stanley Kubrick

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

cinephilearchive:

100 behind-the-scenes photos that span the entire production of Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey.’ Great job, Larry Wright!

“European filmmakers, including George Sluizer (director of ‘Spoorloos,’ aka ‘The Vanishing’ and ‘Utz’), Peter Delpeut (‘Felice… Felice…’) and Harry Kümel (‘Daughters of Darkness,’ ‘Malpertuis’) discuss the films and famously obsessive work practices of Stanley Kubrick. Kubrick thought Sluizer’s ‘The Vanishing’ the most terrifying film he had seen—even more frightening than ‘The Shining,’ and it led to Kubrick ‘phoning the Dutch filmmaker to discuss editing. There is also an interview with Johanna ter Steege, who was set to star in Kubrick’s so-called ‘lost Holocaust’ movie ‘The Aryan Papers,’ which was dropped after Steven Spielberg made ‘Schindler’s List.’ It ends with (who else?) Malcolm McDowell in performance, recounting a tale of working with Kubrick.” —Paul Gallagher, Dangerous Minds

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going: